A cemetery is a peaceful place for families to grieve and visit their loved ones. Some travel hours or days just to pay their respects to friends and family that were often lost too soon. When visiting a final resting place, it’s important to be respectful to both the living and the dead. We sometimes need to be reminded what acceptable cemetery behavior entails so we can be responsible visitors. Join us as we review how to behave at a cemetery, so you can pay your respects while preserving the peace and educate others in the process.

Abide by Cemetery Rules

Most cemeteries have their own rules, and they are usually posted in a convenient place for all to see. Some are only open from dawn until dusk, while others forbid bicycles or prohibit alcoholic beverages. Your actions should not interfere with the privacy of others. Do your best to preserve the calm of the cemetery by following the specific rules and regulations of your loved one’s final resting place. Observing graveyard guidelines will help the caretaker perform his or her responsibilities in a safe and efficient way.

Drive on Roadways

Leave your vehicle in the parking lot, if possible. If you drive through the cemetery, stay on the roadways and stay within the speed limit or go slowly. Although you may be on high alert, funeral processions and those who are mourning may not be paying close attention. Watch for anyone who may be distracted. Offer to the pull to the side if you meet another vehicle on a narrow roadway. Never drive on the grass, or you could cause damage to memorials.

Keep the Noise Down

No one expects complete silence when they visit a communal resting place, but keeping your noise level to a minimum is just an important part of being respectful to others. Remember to set your cell phone to vibrate so it does not disturb other nearby. If you are in a vehicle or driving down a roadway, turn the radio volume down.

Visiting with Children

Visiting a cemetery with your child can be a special experience. Whether saying hello to a deceased parent or visiting a close friend, this significant occasion can be reflective and emotional. Remember to keep your child close so he or she doesn’t get lost in a large cemetery. It is also important to prevent him or her from playing on any monuments, tombstones, or grave markers. Children should not run, yell, or roll around. Cemeteries are not playgrounds, and they should not be treated as such. Take this opportunity to teach your children how to behave at a cemetery.

Treat others as you would like to be treated during the difficult time of losing a loved one. If you have any questions about cemetery behavior, please feel free to contact any of the memorial experts as Legacy Headstones for further assistance or additional information.